O Lusty May!

May Queen

The May Queen ~ Alfred, Lord Ten­nyson

You must wake and call me ear­ly, call me ear­ly, moth­er dear;
To-mor­row ’ill be the hap­pi­est time of all the glad New-year;
Of all the glad New-year, moth­er, the mad­dest mer­ri­est day,
For I’m to be Queen o’ the May, moth­er, I’m to be Queen o’ the May.

There’s many a black, black eye, they say, but none so bright as mine;
There’s Mar­garet and Mary, there’s Kate and Car­o­line;
But none so fair as lit­tle Alice in all the land they say,
So I’m to be Queen o’ the May, moth­er, I’m to be Queen o’ the May.

I sleep so sound all night, moth­er, that I shall nev­er wake,
If you do not call me loud when the day begins to break;
But I must gath­er knots of flow­ers, and buds and gar­lands gay,
For I’m to be Queen o’ the May, moth­er, I’m to be Queen o’ the May.

As I came up the val­ley whom think ye should I see
But Robin lean­ing on the bridge beneath the hazel-tree?
He thought of that sharp look, moth­er, I gave him yes­ter­day,
But I’m to be Queen o’ the May, moth­er, I’m to be Queen o’ the May.

He thought I was a ghost, moth­er, for I was all in white,
And I ran by him with­out speak­ing, like a flash of light.
They call me cru­el-heart­ed, but I care not what they say,
For I’m to be Queen o’ the May, moth­er, I’m to be Queen o’ the May.

They say he’s dying all for love, but that can nev­er be;
They say his heart is break­ing, mother–what is that to me?
There’s many a bold­er lad ’ill woo me any sum­mer day,
And I’m to be Queen o’ the May, moth­er, I’m to be Queen o’ the May.

Lit­tle Effie shall go with me to-mor­row to the green,
And you’ll be there, too, moth­er, to see me made the Queen;
For the shep­herd lads on every side ’ill come from far away,
And I’m to be Queen o’ the May, moth­er, I’m to be Queen o’ the May.

The hon­ey­suck­le round the porch has woven its wavy bow­ers,
And by the mead­ow-trench­es blow the faint sweet cuck­oo-flow­ers;
And the wild marsh-marigold shines like fire in swamps and hol­lows gray,
And I’m to be Queen o’ the May, moth­er, I’m to be Queen o’ the May.

The night-winds come and go, moth­er, upon the mead­ow-grass,
And the hap­py stars above them seem to bright­en as they pass;
There will not be a drop of rain the whole of the live­long day,
And I’m to be Queen o’ the May, moth­er, I’m to be Queen o’ the May.

All the val­ley, moth­er, ’ill be fresh and green and still,
And the cowslip and the crow­foot are over all the hill,
And the rivulet in the flow­ery dale ’ill mer­ri­ly glance and play,
For I’m to be Queen o’ the May, moth­er, I’m to be Queen o’ the May.

So you must wake and call me ear­ly, call me ear­ly, moth­er dear,
To-mor­row ’ill be the hap­pi­est time of all the glad New-year;
To-mor­row ’ill be of all the year the mad­dest mer­ri­est day,
For I’m to be Queen o’ the May, moth­er, I’m to be Queen o’ the May.


Today’s pro­gram is pre­sent­ed by Gabrielle Riel. To lis­ten, click here to start your play­er . If you are in the Unit­ed States, please use the fol­low­ing link: http://loudcity.com/stations/radio-riel/tune_in .

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